Patients with high-dose diuretics should get ultrafiltration in the management of decompensated heart failure: a meta-analysis.

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Patients with high-dose diuretics should get ultrafiltration in the management of decompensated heart failure: a meta-analysis.

Heart Fail Rev. 2019 11;24(6):927-940

Authors: Shi X, Bao J, Zhang H, Wang H, Li L, Zhang Y

Abstract
The identification of specific patients with decompensated heart failure (DHF) who may benefit from ultrafiltration (UF) is important in clinical practice. We undertook a meta-analysis to compare the effects of ultrafiltration and diuretics on major clinical outcomes. The outcomes included weight change, length of hospital stay, rehospitalization for HF, mortality, change in serum creatinine, dialysis dependence, and adverse outcomes. We identified 14 trials including 975 patients with HF, met the eligibility criteria. There was a reduction in heart failure-related rehospitalization in ultrafiltration group when compared with the diuretic group. Subgroup analyses revealed a trend toward the decreased HF readmissions in ultrafiltration plus diuretic therapy group but did not reach statistical significance compared with ultrafiltration alone therapy. Overall, UF treatment did not produce apparent beneficial effects for weight loss, lengths of hospitalization, total mortality, the change of serum creatinine, and dialysis rate. Subgroup analyses showed increase in the serum creatinine were significantly higher for a higher dose regimen (> 200 mg/day) when compared with lower dose diuretic therapy (< 200 mg/day). As for adverse events, UF patients were associated with an increased risk of hypotension and lower risk of neurologic symptoms. The current results revealed ultrafiltration was associated with significant reduction in the rate of rehospitalization. Increase in the serum creatinine was observed in patients with high-dose diuretic regimen. Patients with high-dose diuretics should get ultrafiltration therapy.

PMID: 31209772 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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