Treatment of Clostridium difficile infection with a small molecule inhibitor of toxin UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity.

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Treatment of Clostridium difficile infection with a small molecule inhibitor of toxin UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2018 Feb 26;:

Authors: Stroke IL, Letourneau JJ, Miller TE, Xu Y, Pechik I, Savoly DR, Ma L, Sturzenbecker LJ, Sabalski J, Stein PD, Webb ML, Hilbert DW

Abstract
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea, with significant morbidity, mortality and associated healthcare costs. The major risk factor for CDI is antimicrobial therapy, which disrupts the normal gut microbiota and allows C. difficile to flourish. Treatment of CDI with antimicrobials is generally effective in the short-term, but recurrent infections are frequent and problematic, indicating that improved treatment options are necessary. Symptoms of disease are largely due to two homologous toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which are glucosyltransferases that inhibit host Rho GTPases. As the normal gut microbiota is an important component of resistance to CDI, our goal was to develop an effective non-antimicrobial therapy. Here we report a highly potent small molecule inhibitor (VB-82252) of TcdA and TcdB. This compound inhibits the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcdB and protects cells from intoxication after challenge with either toxin. Oral dosing of the inhibitor prevented inflammation in a murine intra-rectal toxin challenge model. In a murine model of recurrent CDI, the inhibitor reduced weight loss and gut inflammation during acute disease and did not cause the recurrent disease that was observed with vancomycin treatment. Lastly, the inhibitor demonstrated similar efficacy to vancomycin in a hamster disease model. Overall, these results demonstrate that small molecule inhibition of C. difficile toxin UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity is a promising non-antimicrobial approach to the treatment of CDI.

PMID: 29483125 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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