Utility of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) as a Predictor of Acute Infarction in New-Onset Acute Vertigo Patients Without Neurologic and Computed Tomography Abnormalities.

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Utility of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) as a Predictor of Acute Infarction in New-Onset Acute Vertigo Patients Without Neurologic and Computed Tomography Abnormalities.

J Emerg Med. 2018 Feb 01;:

Authors: Lee SH, Yun SJ, Ryu S, Choi SW, Kim HJ, Kang TK, Chan Oh S, Cho SJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been used as a predictive marker for various conditions. However, there are no previous studies about NLR as a prognostic marker for acute infarction.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the potential utility of NLR as a predictor of acute infarction in acute vertigo patients without neurologic and computed tomography (CT) abnormalities.
METHODS: We conducted a prospective, observational study in the Emergency Department (ED) between January 2015 and December 2016. All patients underwent physical examination, laboratory tests, CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results of the initial and follow-up MRI with clinical progress note were considered as the reference standard. Statistically, multivariate logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used.
RESULTS: Thirty-five (25.9%) patients were diagnosed with acute infarction and 100 (74.1%) patients were diagnosed with peripheral vertigo. Horizontal nystagmus (p = 0.03; odds ratio 0.22) and NLR (p = 0.03; odds ratio 5.4) were significant factors for the differential diagnosis of acute infarction and peripheral vertigo. NLR > 2.8 showed the greatest area under the ROC curve (AUC; 0.819), optimal sensitivity (85.7%), and specificity (78.0%). NLR > 1.4 showed the highest sensitivity (97.1%) and relatively low specificity (41%). The absence of horizontal nystagmus increased the specificity (81.0%) and AUC (0.844).
CONCLUSIONS: A combination of NLR > 2.8 and the absence of horizontal nystagmus is sufficiently specific for acute infarction in an ED patient with acute vertigo; thus, further testing with MRI is indicated. NLR < 2.8 by itself or combined with the presence of horizontal nystagmus is not sufficiently sensitive to rule out the need for further testing.

PMID: 29398242 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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