Inappropriate Prescribing in Older Hospitalized Adults: A Comparison of Medical Specialties.

Link to article at PubMed

Inappropriate Prescribing in Older Hospitalized Adults: A Comparison of Medical Specialties.

J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Oct 04;:

Authors: Juliano ACDSRS, Lucchetti ALG, Silva JTSD, Santos LG, Nunes JBT, Fernandes GC, Lucchetti G

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence and number of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in hospitalized older adults, comparing prescription patterns of medical specialties.
DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.
SETTING: Tertiary general hospital.
PARTICIPANTS: All older adults hospitalized from January through May 2015 (N = 1,900).
MEASUREMENTS: Information on medications prescribed during the first and last days of hospitalization was collected and evaluated regarding PIMs using Beers and Screening Tool of Older People's Prescriptions (STOPP) criteria. Medical specialties (internal medicine, cardiology, gastroenterology, infectious disease, nephrology, neurology, pneumology) were compared regarding the prevalence of PIMs and the increase in the number of PIMs during hospitalization.
RESULTS: The number of individuals with PIMs increased significantly according to both criteria (62.3% to 66.6% according to Beers criteria, 43.4% to 50.0% according to STOPP criteria). The most common PIMs were sliding-scale insulin (26.9%), clonazepam (9.5%), and periciazine (6.4%) using Beers criteria and spironolactone (10.3%), acetylsalicylic acid (9.8%), and periciazine (8.7%) using STOPP criteria. Neurology, infectious disease, and pneumology had the highest numbers of PIMs, and neurology, pneumology, and cardiology had a greater increase in PIMs during hospitalization than the other specialties.
CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the high and growing prevalence of PIMs in the hospital environment, according to Beers and STOPP criteria. Educational measures and specific pharmaceutical interventions for each specialty are needed to change this situation.

PMID: 28975608 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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