Intestinal colonization with resistant bacteria: a prognostic marker of mortality in decompensated cirrhosis.

Link to article at PubMed

Intestinal colonization with resistant bacteria: a prognostic marker of mortality in decompensated cirrhosis.

Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2017 Sep 30;:

Authors: Pouriki S, Vrioni G, Sambatakou H, Alexopoulou A, Vasilieva L, Mani I, Tsakris A, Dourakis SP

Abstract
Infections due to drug-resistant (DR) bacteria are increasingly recognized as an emerging problem worldwide. Asymptomatically colonized patients may contribute to the reservoir in the hospital setting, causing both horizontal transmission and endogenous infections. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of intestinal colonization with DR bacteria on subsequent clinical infection development and prognosis in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. One hundred seven patients without infection at baseline were screened and prospectively followed-up for 3 months. Among the patients screened, DR bacteria were isolated in 47 (43.9%), 14 colonized with multidrug- (MDR) and 33 with extensively drug (XDR)-resistant bacteria or a mixture of MDR/XDR bacteria. Severity of liver disease and demographic characteristics were similar among groups. The 20 (42.6%) with DR vs 14 (23.3%) without had hepatic encephalopathy and/or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis episodes over the past 6 months (p = 0.034). One third of both DR and non-DR groups developed infection during follow-up but in only 7 and 5, respectively, the infection was microbiologically documented. In a 3-month-follow-up period, mortality was higher in patients colonized with XDR compared to those without (log rank p = 0.027). In multivariate analysis, colonization with XDR bacteria [HR = 1.074, (CI:1.024-1.126), p = 0.003] and MELD score [HR = 2.579 (1.109-5.996), p = 0.028] were independently associated with low survival. Asymptomatic GI colonization with DR bacteria is a risk factor for increased mortality in decompensated cirrhosis. Frequent hospitalizations for complications of the underlying disease and selective pressure induced by the use of antimicrobials are probably the main determinants.

PMID: 28963603 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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