Empirical antifungal treatment for diagnosed and undiagnosed invasive fungal disease in patients with hematologic malignancies.

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Empirical antifungal treatment for diagnosed and undiagnosed invasive fungal disease in patients with hematologic malignancies.

Curr Med Res Opin. 2017 Sep 28;:1-19

Authors: Deng Q, Lv HR, Lin XM, Zhao MF, Geng L, Li YM

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Empirical antifungal therapy is effective in some patients with risk factors for invasive fungal disease (IFD) who do not qualify for the EORTC/MSG criteria for IFD, but who fail to respond to anti-bacterial and anti-viral therapy.
OBJECTIVE: This retrospective single-center study investigated the epidemiology of IFD and empirical antifungal therapy in patients with hematological malignancies.
METHODS: This study recruited 893 patients with hematologic malignancies who had failed to respond to anti-bacterial and anti-viral treatment and received antifungal therapy, but not for antifungal prophylaxis. Antifungal therapy regimens included amphotericin B, voriconazole, itraconazole, and caspofungin. A total of 689 patients were diagnosed with proven, probable, or possible IFD, while 159 patients did not meet the EORTC/MSG criteria for IFD diagnosis but recovered with antifungal treatment, and 45 were excluded from having IFD. Effective treatment was defined as the disappearance or resolution of clinical symptoms of IFD.
RESULTS: Patients diagnosed with IFD underwent chemotherapy at a higher proportion, and had significantly higher neutrophil counts compared to those who did not qualify for the EORTC/MSG criteria for IFD but responded to antifungals. The mortality due to all causes within 3 months was significantly higher for patients diagnosed with proven IFD, compared with those who did not qualify for the EORTC/MSG criteria for IFD. There was no discontinuation reported due to adverse events of Caspofungin.
CONCLUSION: Empirical antifungal treatment could help save the lives of some patients with severe infections who are highly suspected of having IFD.

PMID: 28956459 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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