Enhancing quality practice for prevention and diagnosis of urinary tract infection during inpatient spinal cord rehabilitation.

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Enhancing quality practice for prevention and diagnosis of urinary tract infection during inpatient spinal cord rehabilitation.

J Spinal Cord Med. 2017 Sep 05;:1-10

Authors: Alavinia SM, Omidvar M, Farahani F, Bayley M, Zee J, Craven BC

Abstract
Objectives To reduce the incidence of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in subacute SCI individuals admitted for tertiary inpatient rehabilitation. Design A quality improvement team was assembled to improve UTI prevention/diagnosis. To plan data collection, UTI-related factors were mapped in an Ishikawa (fishbone) driver diagram. Data including patient demographics, presence and frequency of signs and/or symptoms of UTI and antibiotic initiation from August to December 2015 were recorded. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive and Negative Predictive Values (PPV, NPV), and Likelihood Ratios (LR) were calculated for each sign and symptom. Setting Tertiary SCI Rehabilitation Results Among 55 inpatients with subacute SCI who had signs/symptoms prompting urine culture and sensitivity (C&S), 32 (58.18%) were diagnosed with a UTI. The most frequent symptoms were foul smelling urine (41%), change in urine color (31%), and incontinence (25%), and the most common sign was fever (34%). Most UTIs (81%) occurred among individuals using Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC), with 46% of catheterizations performed by nurses. Foul smelling urine had the highest sensitivity (0.50, 95% CI: 0.31-0.69), and new incontinence had the highest specificity (0.88, 95% CI: 0.69-0.97) for UTI diagnosis. The highest PPV belonged to the cloudy urine (0.71, 95% CI: 0.42-0.92). The combination of cloudy and foul smelling urine increased the PPV to 78% (95% CI: (0.40-0.97). Conclusions The concurrent presence of cloudy and foul smelling urine is predicted of UTI diagnosis inpatients tertiary setting. SCI inpatients are susceptible to UTI when learning CIC technique from nurses.

PMID: 28872426 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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