Transfusing Wisely: Clinical Decision Support Improves Blood Transfusion Practices.

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Transfusing Wisely: Clinical Decision Support Improves Blood Transfusion Practices.

Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2017 Aug;43(8):389-395

Authors: Jenkins I, Doucet JJ, Clay B, Kopko P, Fipps D, Hemmen E, Paulson D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The cost and risks of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, along with evidence of overuse, suggest that improving transfusion practices is a key opportunity for health systems to improve both the quality and value of patient care. Previous work, which included a BestPractice Advisory (BPA), was adapted in a quality improvement project designed to reduce both exposure to unnecessary blood products and costs.
METHODS: A prospective, pre-post study was conducted at an academic medical center with a diverse patient population. All noninfant inpatients without gastrointestinal bleeding who were not within 12 hours of surgical procedures were included. The interventions were education, a BPA, and other enhancements to the computerized provider order entry system.
RESULTS: The percentage of multiunit (≥ 2 units) RBC transfusions decreased from 59.9% to 41.7% during the intervention period and to 19.7% postintervention (p < 0.0001). The percentage of inpatient RBC transfusion units administered for hemoglobin (Hb) ≥ 7 g/dL declined from 72.3% to 57.8% during the intervention period and to 38.0% for the postintervention period (p < 0.0001). The overall rate of inpatient RBC transfusion (units administered per 1,000 patient-days without exclusions) decreased from 89.8 to 78.1 during the intervention period and to 72.7 during the postintervention period (p <0.0001). The estimated annual cost savings was $1,050,750.
CONCLUSION: The interventions reduced multiunit transfusions (by 67.1%) and transfusions for Hb ≥ 7 g/dL (by 47.4%). The improvement in the overall transfusion rate (19.0%) was less marked, limited by better baseline performance relative to other centers.

PMID: 28738984 [PubMed - in process]

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