Working Despite Having Influenza-Like Illness: Results of An Anonymous Survey of Healthcare Providers Who Care for Transplant Recipients.

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Working Despite Having Influenza-Like Illness: Results of An Anonymous Survey of Healthcare Providers Who Care for Transplant Recipients.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2017 May 18;:1-4

Authors: Mossad SB, Deshpande A, Schramm S, Liu X, Rothberg MB

Abstract
OBJECTIVE To compare the rates of and reasons for presenteeism associated with influenza-like illness (ILI) among healthcare professionals (HCPs) caring for hospitalized inpatient transplant recipients and internal medicine patients. DESIGN We designed a 10-question anonymous survey in which ILI was defined as fever (>37.8°C) and cough and/or sore throat and ILI B was defined as fever (>37.8°C) or cough or sore throat; both definitions were considered in the absence of another known cause. SETTING Tertiary-care center. PARTICIPANTS Physicians, advanced practice providers (APPs) and nurses. INTERVENTION Survey deployed at peak of influenza activity in 2016. MEASUREMENTS Rates of ILI, presenteeism, wearing masks, and time away due to ILI. RESULTS Of 707 HCPs surveyed, 286 (40%) responded; 15 (5.2%) reported having ILI, and 73 (25.5%) reported having ILI B in the preceding 2 weeks. Presenteeism rates were 92% in both groups of HCPs and were higher among women (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.64; 95% CI, 1.23-5.71; P=.01) and those ≤40 years old (AOR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.03-3.68; P=.04). Healthcare professionals who cared for transplant recipients and female HCPs were more likely to wear masks (AOR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.05-3.40; P=.04 for transplant recipients and AOR, 3.96; 95% CI, 1.35-11.63; P=.01 for female HCPs). Nurses were more likely than physicians and APPs to take time off (AOR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.10-10.09; P=.03.) CONCLUSIONS Presenteeism among HCPs with ILI is common, including among those caring for transplant recipients. Nonpunitive systems should encourage HCPs not to work with ILI and to wear masks to prevent spread of infections. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;1-4.

PMID: 28514976 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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