Adequacy of chest compressions performed by medical housestaff.

Link to article at PubMed

Adequacy of chest compressions performed by medical housestaff.

Hosp Pract (Minneap). 2011 Aug;39(3):44-9

Authors: Greenstein Y, Lakticova V, Kory P, Mayo P

Abstract
Background: Chest compressions (CCs) are a critical part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We studied the presence and duration of adequate CCs performed by medical housestaff, and correlated our findings with gender and body mass index. Methods: Fifty-eight first-postgraduate-year medical housestaff performed CCs on a computerized patient simulator equipped with a calibrated CC measurement device. Following initial testing, subjects were trained to perform adequate CCs. Subjects were retested 2 weeks later. Presence and duration of adequate CCs were measured during a 120-second endurance test. Results: Before training, 14/28 (50%) of the male housestaff performed adequate CCs and 0/30 (0%) of the female housestaff performed adequate CCs. After training, 25/28 (89%) of the male housestaff and 16/30 (53%) of the female housestaff performed adequate CCs. Body mass index and height were not related to adequacy of CCs. After training, 7/28 (25%) of the male subjects and 1/30 (3%) of the female subjects were able to maintain adequate CCs for 120 seconds. Conclusions: Training housestaff on a patient simulator is an effective means of improving the adequacy of CCs. Despite training, a significant number of women were unable to perform adequate CCs compared with men; body mass index and height were not determining factors. Very few housestaff were able to sustain 120 seconds of adequate CCs, despite training.

PMID: 21881391 [PubMed - in process]

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