Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants versus vitamin K antagonists in atrial fibrillation patients with previous stroke or intracranial hemorrhage: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

Link to article at PubMed

Clin Cardiol. 2021 May 20. doi: 10.1002/clc.23647. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Several observational studies have compared the effectiveness and safety outcomes between nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with a history of either stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) or intracranial hemorrhage. Therefore, our current meta-analysis aimed to address this issue. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Embase databases were systematically searched until December 2020 for all relevant observational studies. We applied a random-effects model to pool adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for this meta-analysis. A total of 10 studies were included. Among patients with a history of stroke/TIA, the use of NOACs versus VKAs was associated with decreased risks of stroke (HR, 0.82, 95% CI 0.69-0.97), systemic embolism (HR, 0.73, 95% CI 0.61-0.87), all-cause death (HR, 0.87, 95% CI 0.81-0.94), major bleeding (HR, 0.77, 95% CI 0.64-0.92) and intracranial hemorrhage (HR, 0.54, 95% CI 0.38-0.77). Among patients with a history of intracranial hemorrhage, the use of NOACs versus VKAs was associated with reduced risks of stroke (HR, 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.95), all-cause death (HR, 0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.94), and intracranial hemorrhage (HR, 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.84). Compared with VKAs, the use of NOACs exhibited superior efficacy and safety outcomes in AF patients with previous stroke/TIA, and the use of NOACs was associated with reduced risks of stroke, all-cause death, and intracranial hemorrhage in patients with a history of intracranial hemorrhage.

PMID:34013988 | DOI:10.1002/clc.23647

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