Clinical features, laboratory findings and predictors of death in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Sardinia, Italy

Link to article at PubMed

Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2020 Jul;24(14):7861-7868. doi: 10.26355/eurrev_202007_22291.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Since December 2019, when the first SARS-CoV2 infections have been reported, the number of cases has increased exponentially. In our University Hospital Unit, the first patient with COVID-19 was admitted on the 8th of March 2020. We aimed to investigate the predictors of death among inpatients with COVID-19.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective, monocentric study, consecutively enrolling patients with SARS-CoV2 infection. Clinical, laboratory, and radiological data were collected from the 8th of March to the 8th of April 2020. We aimed to describe the most frequent clinical and laboratory features and predictors of death among patients admitted to our Unit.

RESULTS: 87 patients were enrolled, 56 (64.4%) were male, with a median age of 72 (IQR 62.5-83.5) years. The majority of our population had at least one comorbidity in their medical anamnesis. Hypertension and cardiovascular disease were the most frequent, followed by obesity. Eighty (92%) patients had at least one symptom, whereas 7 (8%) were asymptomatic. The most common symptoms were fever and dyspnoea. Overall, 53 patients had lung disease confirmed at CT scan (60.9%). Twenty-five (28.7%) deaths occurred. Statistically significant predictors of death at multivariate analysis were lymphocytes count <900 cells/mm3, moderate ARDS, and lack of compliance at baseline.

CONCLUSIONS: This is the first Italian experience available. Our results seem to be in line with international literature. As highlighted by our data, more studies are needed to investigate the role of lymphocytes subsets, CT scan values. Furthermore, therapy choice and timing in this challenging setting should be urgently investigated in randomized clinical trials.

PMID:32744714 | DOI:10.26355/eurrev_202007_22291

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