Prevalence and Impact of Myocardial Injury in Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19 Infection.

Link to article at PubMed

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Prevalence and Impact of Myocardial Injury in Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19 Infection.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2020 Jun 05;:

Authors: Lala A, Johnson KW, Januzzi JL, Russak AJ, Paranjpe I, Richter F, Zhao S, Somani S, Van Vleck T, Vaid A, Chaudhry F, De Freitas JK, Fayad ZA, Pinney SP, Levin M, Charney A, Bagiella E, Narula J, Glicksberg BS, Nadkarni G, Mancini DM, Fuster V, Mount Sinai Covid Informatics Center

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The degree of myocardial injury, as reflected by troponin elevation, and associated outcomes among US hospitalized patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) are unknown.
OBJECTIVES: To describe the degree of myocardial injury and associated outcomes in a large hospitalized cohort with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19.
METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 admitted to one of five Mount Sinai Health System hospitals in New York City between February 27th and April 12th, 2020 with troponin-I (normal value <0.03ng/mL) measured within 24 hours of admission were included (n=2,736). Demographics, medical history, admission labs, and outcomes were captured from the hospitals' EHR.
RESULTS: The median age was 66.4 years, with 59.6% men. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) including coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure, was more prevalent in patients with higher troponin concentrations, as were hypertension and diabetes. A total of 506 (18.5%) patients died during hospitalization. In all, 985 (36%) patients had elevated troponin concentrations. After adjusting for disease severity and relevant clinical factors, even small amounts of myocardial injury (e.g. troponin I 0.03-0.09ng/mL, n=455, 16.6%) were significantly associated with death (adjusted HR: 1.75, 95% CI 1.37-2.24; P<0.001) while greater amounts (e.g. troponin I>0.09 ng/dL, n=530, 19.4%) were significantly associated with higher risk (adjusted HR 3.03, 95% CI 2.42-3.80; P<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Myocardial injury is prevalent among patients hospitalized with COVID-19 however troponin concentrations were generally present at low levels. Patients with CVD are more likely to have myocardial injury than patients without CVD. Troponin elevation among patients hospitalized with COVID-19 is associated with higher risk of mortality.

PMID: 32517963 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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