The clinical data from 19 critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019: a single-centered, retrospective, observational study.

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The clinical data from 19 critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019: a single-centered, retrospective, observational study.

Z Gesundh Wiss. 2020 Apr 21;:1-4

Authors: Zhang J, Liu P, Wang M, Wang J, Chen J, Yuan W, Li M, Xie Z, Dong W, Li H, Zhao Y, Wan L, Chu T, Wang L, Zhang H, Tao T, Ma J

Abstract
Background: The objectives of this study were to analyze the clinical features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and evaluate the diagnosis and treatment.
Methods: A retrospective analysis of the clinical manifestation and auxiliary examination of 19 patients with COVID-19 from the Liyuan Hospital intensive care unit (ICU) between January 16, 2020 and February 20, 2020 was undertaken.
Results: There were 11 male and 8 female cases among the patients. The median (range) age was 73 (38-91) years. Of these patients, 8 (42.1%) had died and the median duration from ICU admission to death was 2 (interquartile range (IQR): 1-10.75) days. Seven of these 8 patients had underlying diseases. The auxiliary examination showed fever (68.4%), dry cough (15.8%), dyspnea (10.5%), and diarrhea (5.3%). All 19 cases showed ground-glass changes on chest computed tomography. Serum hypersensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum amylase A (SAA) were clearly increased in all of the cases. Among the 19 cases, there were 16 (84.2%) cases in which the total number of lymphocytes decreased, 12 cases (63%) had reduced liver function, and 11 cases (58%) had deviant results for fibrinogen (FIB) and D-dimer, in particular, the D-dimer level was significantly higher in the non-survivors compared with the survivors.
Conclusion: There were more men than women among critically ill patients. All of the cases showed ground-glass changes on chest computed tomography and the vast majority of patients displayed fever and dry cough. The clinical laboratory indices change significantly, especially the D-dimer level among non-survivors.

PMID: 32318325 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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