Admission Serum Potassium Levels in Hospitalized Patients and One-Year Mortality.

Link to article at PubMed

Admission Serum Potassium Levels in Hospitalized Patients and One-Year Mortality.

Medicines (Basel). 2019 Dec 30;7(1):

Authors: Thongprayoon C, Cheungpasitporn W, Hansrivijit P, Mao MA, Medaura J, Bathini T, Chewcharat A, Erickson SB

Abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between admission serum potassium and one-year mortality in all adult hospitalized patients. Methods: All adult hospitalized patients who had an admission serum potassium level between the years 2011 and 2013 at a tertiary referral hospital were enrolled. End-stage kidney disease patients were excluded. Admission serum potassium was categorized into levels of ≤2.9, 3.0-3.4, 3.5-3.9, 4.0-4.4, 4.5-4.9, 5.0-5.4, and ≥5.5 mEq/L. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to assess the independent association between admission serum potassium and one-year mortality after hospital admission, using an admission potassium level of 4.0-4.4 mEq/L as the reference group. Results: A total of 73,983 patients with mean admission potassium of 4.2 ± 0.5 mEq/L were studied. Of these, 12.6% died within a year after hospital admission, with the lowest one-year mortality associated with an admission serum potassium of 4.0-4.4 mEq/L. After adjustment for age, sex, race, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), principal diagnosis, comorbidities, medications, acute kidney injury, mechanical ventilation, and other electrolytes at hospital admission, both a low admission serum potassium ≤3.9 mEq/L and elevated admission potassium ≥5.0 mEq/L were significantly associated with an increased risk of one-year mortality, when compared with an admission serum potassium of 4.0-4.4 mEq/L. Subgroup analysis of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease patients showed similar results. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that hypokalemia ≤3.9 mEq/L and hyperkalemia ≥5.0 mEq/L at the time of hospital admission were associated with higher one-year mortality.

PMID: 31905856 [PubMed]

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