High-Flow Oxygen Therapy to Speed Weaning From Mechanical Ventilation: A Prospective Randomized Study.

Link to article at PubMed

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High-Flow Oxygen Therapy to Speed Weaning From Mechanical Ventilation: A Prospective Randomized Study.

Am J Crit Care. 2019 Sep;28(5):370-376

Authors: Liu F, Shao Q, Jiang R, Zeng Z, Liu Y, Li Y, Liu Q, Ding C, Zhao N, Peng Z, Qian K

Abstract
BACKGROUND: High-flow oxygen therapy has been widely adopted, but its use for weaning patients from mechanical ventilation has not been reported.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether high-flow oxygen therapy improves the efficiency of weaning patients from mechanical ventilation.
METHODS: In a single-center, prospective study, patients receiving mechanical ventilation were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (T-tube, pressure support ventilation, or high-flow oxygen) during 2-hour spontaneous breathing trials in a 14-day study. Participants were followed up until hospital discharge or death.
RESULTS: Of 268 patients included, 90 were assigned to the T-tube group, 96 to the pressure support ventilation group, and 82 to the high-flow oxygen group. The first-day 2-hour spontaneous breathing trial passing rates were higher in the pressure support ventilation and high-flow oxygen groups than in the T-tube group (P < .05). The time needed to pass the spontaneous breathing trial was less in the pressure support ventilation and high-flow oxygen groups than in the T-tube group (P < .05). The reintubation rate was lower and the successful weaning rate on the first day was higher in the high-flow oxygen group than in the T-tube and pressure support ventilation groups (P < .05). During the 14-day study period, the weaning time was less in the high-flow oxygen group than in the T-tube and pressure support ventilation groups (P < .05).
CONCLUSION: High-flow oxygen therapy can reduce the time needed to wean patients from mechanical ventilation by shortening the time needed to pass a spontaneous breathing trial and by decreasing the reintubation rate.

PMID: 31474607 [PubMed - in process]

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