Treatment of exacerbations as a predictor of subsequent outcomes in patients with COPD.

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Treatment of exacerbations as a predictor of subsequent outcomes in patients with COPD.

Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2018;13:1297-1308

Authors: Calverley PM, Anzueto AR, Dusser D, Mueller A, Metzdorf N, Wise RA

Abstract
Rationale: Exacerbations of COPD are managed differently, but whether treatment of one exacerbation predicts the likelihood of subsequent events is unknown.
Objective: We examined whether the treatment given for exacerbations predicted subsequent outcomes.
Methods: This was a post-hoc analysis of 17,135 patients with COPD from TIOtropium Safety and Performance In Respimat® (TIOSPIR®). Patients treated with tiotropium with one or more moderate to severe exacerbations on study were analyzed using descriptive statistics, logistic and Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier plots.
Results: Of 8,061 patients with moderate to severe exacerbation(s), demographics were similar across patients with exacerbations treated with antibiotics and/or steroids or hospitalization. Exacerbations treated with systemic corticosteroids alone or in combination with antibiotics had the highest risk of subsequent exacerbation (HR: 1.21, P=0.0004 and HR: 1.33, P<0.0001, respectively), and a greater risk of having a hospitalized (severe) exacerbation (HR: 1.59 and 1.63, P<0.0001, respectively) or death (HR: 1.50, P=0.0059 and HR: 1.47, P=0.0002, respectively) compared with exacerbations treated with antibiotics alone. Initial hospitalization led to the highest risk of subsequent hospitalization (all-cause or COPD related [severe exacerbation], HR: 3.35 and 4.31, P<0.0001, respectively) or death (all-cause or COPD related, HR: 3.53 and 5.54, P<0.0001, respectively) versus antibiotics alone.
Conclusion: These data indicate that the way exacerbations are treated initially is a useful guide to the patient's subsequent clinical course. Factors that clinicians consider when making treatment choices require further clarification.

PMID: 29719385 [PubMed - in process]

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