Trends of hospitalizations for syncope/collapse in the united states from 2004 to 2013- an analysis of national inpatient sample.

Link to article at PubMed

Trends of hospitalizations for syncope/collapse in the united states from 2004 to 2013- an analysis of national inpatient sample.

J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2018 Mar 05;:

Authors: Anand V, Benditt DG, Adkisson WO, Garg S, George SA, Adabag S

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Syncope/ collapse is a common reason for emergency department visits, and approximately 30-40% of these individuals are hospitalized. We examined changes in hospitalization rates, in-hospital mortality and cost of syncope/collapse-related hospital care in the U.S. from 2004 to 2013.
METHODS: We used U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2004 through 2013 to identify syncope/collapse-related hospitalizations using ICD-9, code 780.2 as the principal discharge diagnosis. Data are presented as mean± SEM.
RESULTS: From 2004 to 2013, there was a 42% reduction in hospitalizations with a principal discharge diagnosis of syncope/collapse from 54,259 (national estimate 253,591) in 2004 to 31,427 (national estimate 156,820) in 2013 (p < 0.0001). The mean length of hospital stays decreased (2.88 ± 0.04 days in 2004 vs. 2.54± 0.02 in 2013; p < 0.0001), while in-hospital mortality did not change (0.28% in 2004 vs. 0.18% in 2013; p = 0.12). However, mean charges (inflation adjusted) for syncope/collapse-related hospitalization increased by 43.6% from $17514 in 2004 to $25160 in 2013 (p < 0.0001). The rates of implantation of permanent pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator remained low during these hospitalizations, and decreased over time (p for both < 0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalization rates for syncope/collapse have decreased significantly in the US from 2004 to 2013. Despite a modest reduction in length of stay, the cost of syncope/ collapse -related hospital care has increased. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 29505697 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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