Noninvasive ventilation failure in pneumonia patients ?65years old: The role of cough strength.

Link to article at PubMed

Noninvasive ventilation failure in pneumonia patients ≥65years old: The role of cough strength.

J Crit Care. 2017 Nov 04;44:149-153

Authors: Hong Y, Duan J, Bai L, Han X, Huang S, Guo S

Abstract
PURPOSE: To explore the association between cough strength and outcomes in elderly patients who received noninvasive ventilation (NIV) due to acute respiratory failure caused by pneumonia.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: We enrolled patients ≥65years old with acute respiratory failure caused by pneumonia. Just before NIV treatment, cough strength was assessed on a cough-strength scale graded from 0 to 5. Patients graded 0-2 were defined as having no/weak coughs and those graded 3-5 were defined as having moderate/strong coughs.
RESULTS: We enrolled 349 patients in this study. The prevalence of no/weak cough was 24% (84/349). Moderate/strong cough patients had lower NIV failure (92/265 [34.7%] vs. 67/84 [79.8%], p<0.01) and lower hospital mortality (85/265 [32.1%] vs. 60/84 [71.4%], p<0.01) than no/weak cough patients. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, we also found that no/weak cough was an independent risk factor for NIV failure (odds ratio=13.83, 95% confidence interval: 6.01-31.81) and death in hospital (odds ratio=4.41, 95% confidence interval: 2.49-7.81).
CONCLUSIONS: In pneumonia patients ≥65years old, no/weak cough is associated with NIV failure and death in hospital. NIV must be used only with caution in no/weak cough patients.

PMID: 29128779 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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