Sodium Phosphate Enemas do not Worsen Renal Function amongst Hospitalized Patients with Mild to Moderate Renal Failure. A Matched, Case-control study.

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Sodium Phosphate Enemas do not Worsen Renal Function amongst Hospitalized Patients with Mild to Moderate Renal Failure. A Matched, Case-control study.

QJM. 2017 Aug 16;:

Authors: Dagan A, Stein GY, Winter S, Avaky C, Hofstetter L, Gringauz I, Biber A, Segal G

Abstract
Background: Sodium Phosphate enemas (SPEs) are widely used amongst hospitalized patients despite their potential to worsen renal failure. The extent to which this side effect is clinically relevant is questionable.
Methods: We conducted a matched case-control, retrospective study in a cohort of hospitalized patients. Patients treated and untreated with SPEs were matched for age, gender, baseline creatinine, usage of certain medications and several background diagnoses. Three groups of matched patients (whole study cohort, patients with baseline creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL and those with baseline creatinine > 2 mg/dL) were compared with regards to their creatinine and blood electrolyte concentrations during 3 consecutive hospitalization days after SPE application.
Results: 412 patients were included in this study of which 206 were treated by single SPEs. Exact matching was done for the whole study cohort, for 108 patients with baseline creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL and for 58 patients with baseline creatinine > 2 mg/dL. During 3 consecutive days after SPEs, the maximal blood concentrations of creatinine, phosphor and potassium did not differ significantly between treated patients and matched controls, in all 3 patients' groups.
Conclusion: Application of sodium phosphate enemas do not seem to worsen mild to moderate renal failure, nor are associated with hyperphosphatemia or hyperkalemia in patients hospitalized in internal medicine departments.

PMID: 29025112 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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