Baseline functional status as the strongest predictor of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: Results of the NONAVASC registry.

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Baseline functional status as the strongest predictor of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: Results of the NONAVASC registry.

Eur J Intern Med. 2017 Sep 24;:

Authors: Gullón A, Formiga F, Camafort M, Mostaza JM, Díez-Manglano J, Cepeda JM, Novo-Veleiro I, Pose A, Suárez Fernández C, NONAVASC study group. Vascular Risk Group of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with higher mortality. We aimed to identify the baseline predictors of in-hospital mortality among elderly patients with non-valvular AF (NVAF) hospitalised for any reason.
METHODS: Observational, prospective and multicentre study was carried out on patients with NVAF over the age of 75, who had been admitted for any acute medical condition to Internal Medicine departments in Spain.
RESULTS: We evaluated 804 patients with a mean age of 85±5.1years, of which 53.9% were females. During the hospitalization 10.1% (n=81) of the patients died. The patients who died were older, had a greater percentage of institutionalization, worse previous basic functional status (Barthel Index), worse cognitive performance at admission and greater proportion of frailty and sarcopenia. Logistic regression multivariate analysis identified that the strongest determinants of in-hospital mortality were the baseline functional status (Barthel Index) (OR for total dependency 4.73, 95% CI 2.32-9.63), and admissions for stroke (OR 3.55, 95% CI 1.41-8.90) and acute renal failure (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.12-3.32).
CONCLUSION: The overall in-hospital mortality of elderly patients with NVFA is high. Among all factors evaluated in the global geriatric assessment the baseline functional status was the strongest predictor for in-hospital mortality on this population.

PMID: 28954714 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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