Predicting Fluid Responsiveness in Critically Ill Patients by Using Combined End-Expiratory and End-Inspiratory Occlusions With Echocardiography.

Link to article at PubMed

Predicting Fluid Responsiveness in Critically Ill Patients by Using Combined End-Expiratory and End-Inspiratory Occlusions With Echocardiography.

Crit Care Med. 2017 Aug 29;:

Authors: Jozwiak M, Depret F, Teboul JL, Alphonsine JE, Lai C, Richard C, Monnet X

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: First, we aimed at assessing whether fluid responsiveness is predicted by the effects of an end-expiratory occlusion on the velocity-time integral of the left ventricular outflow tract. Second, we investigated whether adding the effects of an end-inspiratory occlusion and of an end-expiratory occlusion on velocity-time integral can predict fluid responsiveness with similar reliability than end-expiratory occlusion alone but with a higher threshold, which might be more compatible with the precision of echocardiography.
DESIGN: Diagnostic study.
SETTING: Medical ICU.
PATIENTS: Thirty mechanically ventilated patients in whom fluid administration was planned.
INTERVENTIONS: A 15-second end-expiratory occlusion and end-inspiratory occlusion, separated by 1 minute, followed by a 500-mL saline administration.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Pulse contour analysis-derived cardiac index and velocity-time integral were measured during the last 5 seconds of 15-second end-inspiratory occlusion and end-expiratory occlusion and after fluid administration. End-expiratory occlusion increased velocity-time integral more in responders than in nonresponders to fluid administration (11% ± 5% vs 3% ± 1%, respectively; p < 0.0001), and end-inspiratory occlusion decreased velocity-time integral more in responders than in nonresponders (12% ± 5% vs 5% ± 2%, respectively; p = 0.0002). When adding the absolute values of changes in velocity-time integral observed during both occlusions, velocity-time integral changed by 23% ± 9% in responders and by 8% ± 3% in nonresponders. Fluid responsiveness was predicted by the end-expiratory occlusion-induced change in velocity-time integral with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.938 (0.785-0.989) and a threshold value of 5%. Fluid responsiveness was predicted by the sum of absolute values of changes in velocity-time integral during both occlusions with a similar reliability (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.973 [0.838-1.000]) but with a threshold of 13%. Both sensitivity and specificity were 93% (68-100%).
CONCLUSIONS: If consecutive end-inspiratory occlusion and end-expiratory occlusion change velocity-time integral is greater than or equal to 13% in total, fluid responsiveness is accurately predicted. This threshold is more compatible with the precision of echocardiography than that obtained by end-expiratory occlusion alone.

PMID: 28857907 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.