Impact on morbidity, mortality and length of stay of hospital acquired infections by resistant microorganisms.

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Impact on morbidity, mortality and length of stay of hospital acquired infections by resistant microorganisms.

Clin Infect Dis. 2017 May 02;:

Authors: Barrasa-Villar JI, Aibar-Remón C, Prieto-Andrés P, Mareca-Doñate R, Moliner-Lahoz J

Abstract
Background: Infections by multiresistant organisms (MRO) are a global threat and particularly common in hospitals. This study was performed to assess the impact of hospital acquired infections caused by MRO on morbidity, mortality and length of hospital stay.
Methods: Retrospective cohort study. A sample of adults aged ≥18 years with a respiratory, urinary, bloodstream or surgical site infection caused by a multiresistant (cases) or sensitive (controls) microorganism was selected. Measurements included hospital mortality from all causes (total and 30 days after infection), length of stay and five indicators of morbidity: intensive care or surgery admissions, number of diagnostic tests after infection and hospital readmissions or visits to the emergency department within 30 days of discharge.
Results: The sample was composed of 324 Cases and 686 Control patients. Risk of hospital mortality from all causes (Hazard Ratio=1.7; 95%CI= 1.25 to 2.32) and 30 day-mortality after infection (HR=1.77; 95%CI = 1.29 to 2.44) were higher in patients with a MRO infection. Probability of readmission was also higher (OR=2.17; 95%CI=1.36-3.46) in the cases group. Emergency department visits were only significantly higher in MRSA (OR=2.93; 95% CI=1.73-4.96) and in E. coli resistant infections (OR= 1.94; 95%CI=1.20-3.12). Infections by MRO weren't associated with any other outcome.
Conclusions: Hospital infections caused by MRO increase mortality, readmissions and, in some cases, visits to the emergency department compared to those produced by susceptible strains. They don't appear to influence length of stay nor the need of hospital admission, intensive care, surgery or diagnostic tests.

PMID: 28472416 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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