Comparison of Outcomes of Patients With Sepsis With Versus Without Acute Myocardial Infarction and Comparison of Invasive Versus Noninvasive Management of the Patients With Infarction.

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Comparison of Outcomes of Patients With Sepsis With Versus Without Acute Myocardial Infarction and Comparison of Invasive Versus Noninvasive Management of the Patients With Infarction.

Am J Cardiol. 2016 Apr 1;117(7):1065-71

Authors: Smilowitz NR, Gupta N, Guo Y, Bangalore S

Abstract
Patients hospitalized with sepsis may be predisposed to acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The incidence, treatment, and outcomes of AMI in sepsis have not been studied. We analyzed data from the National Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2011 for patients with a diagnosis of sepsis. The incidence of AMI as a nonprimary diagnosis was evaluated. Propensity score matching was used to identify a cohort of patients with secondary AMI and sepsis with similar baseline characteristics who were managed invasively (defined as cardiac catheterization, percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI], or coronary artery bypass graft [CABG] surgery) or conservatively. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. A total of 2,602,854 patients had a diagnosis of sepsis. AMI was diagnosed in 118,183 patients (4.5%), the majority with non-ST elevation AMI (71.4%). In-hospital mortality was higher in patients with AMI and sepsis than those with sepsis alone (35.8% vs 16.8%, p <0.0001; adjusted odds ratio 1.24, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.26). In patients with AMI, 11,899 patients (10.1%) underwent an invasive management strategy, in which 4,668 patients (39.2%) underwent revascularization. PCI was performed in 3,413 patients (73.1%), CABG in 1,165 (25.0%), and both CABG and PCI in 90 patients (1.9%). In a propensity-matched cohort of 23,708 patients with AMI, invasive management was associated with a lower mortality than conservative management (19.0% vs 33.4%, p <0.001; odds ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.50). In subgroups that underwent revascularization, the odds of mortality were consistently lower than corresponding matched subjects from the conservative group. In conclusion, myocardial infarction not infrequently complicates sepsis and is associated with a significant increase in in-hospital mortality. Patients managed invasively had a lower mortality than those managed conservatively.

PMID: 26853952 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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