Radial Versus Femoral Access in Invasively Managed Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Link to article at PubMed

Radial Versus Femoral Access in Invasively Managed Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Ann Intern Med. 2015 Nov 10;

Authors: Andò G, Capodanno D

Abstract
Background: Studies in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing invasive management showed conflicting conclusions regarding the effect of access site on outcomes.
Purpose: To summarize evidence from recent, high-quality trials that compared clinical outcomes occurring with radial versus femoral access in invasively managed adults with ACS.
Data Sources: English-language publications in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases between January 1990 and August 2015.
Study Selection: Randomized trials of radial versus femoral access in invasively managed patients with ACS.
Data Extraction: Two investigators independently extracted the study data and rated the risk of bias.
Data Synthesis: Of 17 identified randomized trials, 4 were high-quality multicenter trials that in total involved 17 133 patients. Pooled data from the 4 trials showed that radial access reduced death (relative risk [RR], 0.73 [95% CI, 0.59 to 0.90]; P = 0.003), major adverse coronary events (RR, 0.86 [CI, 0.75 to 0.98]; P = 0.025), and major bleeding (RR, 0.57 [CI, 0.37 to 0.88]; P = 0.011). Radial procedures lasted slightly longer (standardized mean difference, 0.11 minute) and had higher risk for access-site crossover (6.3% versus 1.7%) than did femoral procedures.
Limitations: Heterogeneity in outcomes definitions and potential treatment modifiers across studies, including operator experience in radial procedures and concurrent anticoagulant regimens.
Conclusions: Compared with femoral access, radial access reduces mortality, major coronary adverse events, and major bleeding in patients with ACS undergoing invasive management.
Primary funding sources: No external funding. (PROSPERO: CRD42015022031).

PMID: 26551857 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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