Impact of rapid screening for discontinuation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus contact precautions.

Link to article at PubMed

Impact of rapid screening for discontinuation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus contact precautions.

Am J Infect Control. 2015 Oct 1;

Authors: Shenoy ES, Lee H, Cotter JA, Ware W, Kelbaugh D, Weil E, Walensky RP, Hooper DC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: A history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a determinant of inpatient bed assignment.
METHODS: We assessed outcomes associated with rapid testing and discontinuation of MRSA contact precautions (CP) in a prospective cohort study of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based screening in the Emergency Department (ED) of Massachusetts General Hospital. Eligible patients had a history of MRSA and were assessed and enrolled if documented off antibiotics with activity against MRSA and screened for nasal colonization (subject visit). PCR-negative subjects had CP discontinued; the primary outcome was CP discontinuation. We identified semiprivate rooms in which a bed was vacant owing to the CP status of the study subject, calculated the hours of vacancy, and compared idle bed-hours by PCR results. Program costs were compared with predicted revenue.
RESULTS: There were 2864 eligible patients, and 648 (22.6%) subject visits were enrolled. Of these, 65.1% (422/648) were PCR-negative and had CP discontinued. PCR-negative subjects had fewer idle bed-hours compared with PCR-positive subjects (28.6 ± 25.2 vs 75.3 ± 70.5; P < .001). The expected revenues from occupied idle beds and averted CP costs ranged from $214,160 to $268,340, and exceeded the program costs.
CONCLUSION: A program of targeted PCR-based screening for clearance of MRSA colonization resulted in expected revenues and decreased CP costs that outweighed programmatic costs.

PMID: 26440593 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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