A combined culture-based methodology for surveillance of hospital-acquired infections and timely remedial action in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi, India.

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A combined culture-based methodology for surveillance of hospital-acquired infections and timely remedial action in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi, India.

Am J Infect Control. 2013 Jul 25;

Authors: Arya SC, Agarwal N, Agarwal S, Murali G, Chattri U

Abstract
The mortality, morbidity and economic loss accompanying hospital acquired infection (HAI) needs constant surveillance. The usefulness of an integrated culture-based watch on the incidence of HAI was established at a tertiary care, multidisciplinary hospital in Delhi. Isolates from all culture-positive hospitalized cases including antibiotic susceptibility profiles were shared instantly with clinicians and nursing personnel. HAI categorization was based on the interval between hospital admission and isolation of a pathogen. The monthly incidence of HAI was calculated as episodes per 100 admissions, while the nature of HAI isolates including infection sites were computed annually. During 2008 to 2010, the monthly HAI rates ranged from 0 to 0.9 per 100 admissions, with no significant difference in annual incidence (P = 0.45, Kruskal Wallis). There was a subtle but insignificant change in HAI localization in urine, blood, pulmonary tissues or surgical sites of the patients (P = 0.104). While 197 of the 229 isolates were Gram-negative, Klebsiella species, E Coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, there were 32 methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (P < 0.0001). The combined strategy of constant surveillance of all culture-positive hospitalized cases and dialogues with clinicians, and nursing personnel enabled a monitoring of HAI incidence and ensured freedom from any spikes of HAI episodes or their cross infection, it was possible to monitor the incidence of HAI and to ensure there were no episodes on any spikes or a cross-infection. An identical nonstop approach should result in an earlier detection and management of HAI.

PMID: 23890743 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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