Elevated Serum Heart-Type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein in the Convalescent Stage Predicts Long-Term Outcome in Patients Surviving Acute Myocardial Infarction.

Link to article at PubMed

Elevated Serum Heart-Type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein in the Convalescent Stage Predicts Long-Term Outcome in Patients Surviving Acute Myocardial Infarction.

Circ J. 2012 Dec 29;

Authors: Matsumoto S, Nakatani D, Sakata Y, Suna S, Shimizu M, Usami M, Hara M, Sumitsuji S, Nanto S, Sasaki T, Hamasaki T, Sato H, Hori M, Komuro I, on Behalf of the Osaka Acute Coronary Insufficiency Study (OACIS) Group

Abstract

Background:?Little is known about the prognostic significance of elevated serum heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) in post-acute myocardial infarction (post-AMI) patients. Methods and Results:?A total of 1,283 post-AMI patients with available serum samples collected in the convalescent stage were studied. During a median follow-up period of 1,785 days, 176 patients (14%) had adverse events (all-cause mortality, n=81; non-fatal MI, n=44; readmission for heart failure [HF], n=51). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to a serum H-FABP level of 6.08ng/ml, which was determined to be the optimal cut-off for discriminating all-cause mortality based on the maximum value of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Patients with elevated H-FABP (>6.08ng/ml, n=224) had a significantly higher incidence of death (18.3% vs. 3.8%, P<0.001) and readmission for HF (10.3% vs. 2.6%, P<0.001), but not of non-fatal MI (4.5% vs. 3.2%, P=0.187), compared to those with H-FABP <6.08ng/ml. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that elevated serum H-FABP was associated with an increased risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-3.51, P=0.039) and readmission for HF (HR, 2.49; 95% CI: 1.15-5.39, P=0.020). Conclusions:?Elevated serum H-FABP during the convalescent stage of AMI predicted long-term mortality and readmission for HF after survival discharge in the post-AMI patients.

PMID: 23291993 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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