Affect of Renal Impairment on Mortality of Patients with Cirrhosis and Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis.

Link to article at PubMed

Affect of Renal Impairment on Mortality of Patients with Cirrhosis and Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Mar 2;

Authors: Hung TH, Tsai CC, Hsieh YH, Tsai CC, Tseng CW, Tsai JJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND & AIMS: The effects of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have not been determined on mortality of patients with cirrhosis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). METHODS: We collected data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Database on 2592 patients with cirrhosis who were hospitalized with SBP from January 1 to December 31, 2004. Patients were matched with individuals from a national mortality database; 30-day and 1-year mortalities were calculated for each group and compared to calculate hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: Of the patients with cirrhosis and SBP, 300 (11.5%) had renal function impairment. Of these, 145 had acute renal failure, 70 had ESRD, and 75 had chronic kidney disease. Overall, 30-day and 1-year mortalities were 21.3% and 51.7% respectively. After adjusting for age, sex, and underlying comorbidities, HRs for 30-day mortality from renal function impairment, acute renal failure, ESRD, and chronic kidney disease were 3.00, 4.68, 1.93, and 1.37, respectively. The HRs for 1-year mortality from renal function impairment, acute renal failure, ESRD, and chronic kidney disease were 2.03, 2.78, 1.70, and 1.37. The adjusted HRs for 30-day and 1-year mortality of patients with acute renal failure were 2.6 and 1.6, compared to patients with ESRD. CONCLUSION: Acute renal failure is a better determinant of 30-day and 1-year mortalities than renal function impairment in cirrhotic patients with SBP.

PMID: 22391345 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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